Digital Know-How For Better Cyber Security

We are at the beginning of an electronic revolution that like earlier industrial revolutions will substantially alter and change our society. This revolution is based on robotics, Artificial Intelligence, bio-technology, IoT, and cybertronics. And this contemporary revolution will merge and combine these innovative technologies.

Each time we go through one of these massive automated revolutions, it completely alters most country’s economics, geo-politics, society and warfare. 

 

  • The First Industrial Revolution used water and steam power to mechanise production.
  • The Second used electric power to create mass production.
  • The Third used electronics and information technology to automate production.

Now we have a Fourth Industrial Revolution, which is a fusion of technologies that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres.

We now have mobile AI super-computing which imitates human thought, Intelligent robots, self-driving cars and biotechnology all of which has applications in major industrial areas, including health care, crop production and agriculture. Each Industrial Revolution has an enormous impact on warfare, society, crime and business.The development has been called a Cyber Innovation or Web 0.3, but is probably best described as the 4th Industrial Revolution.

What is Cyber?

Cyber-space can be visualised as an electronic nervous system running through many national and international sectors and systems. Cyber is in fact the term used to describe any digital/electronic connections you have with and on your computer.

This new electronic revolution is developing and employing emerging computing technologies such as Artificial Intelligence, cognitive electronics, advanced analysis, biotechnology, and quantum computing and has already developed such things as new methods of commercial production, specific facial recognition to new bio-technology.

This process will alter everything from enhance human brain thinking to automated avionics and robotics and gradually this process will globally connect and change all types of jobs within everything from education, business, transport, crime, policing, the military to government.

We have already connected over half the world’s population, 4.2 billion currently to the web. In 2008 the number of Web connections was just 350 million.

By connecting even more billions of people using mobile devices, electronic connections, storage capability, information accessibility and processing power this revolution will substantially increase the size of the interconnected the world. For instance, if you were born and living in Nigeria and you review and discuss options, the mobile you use suggests you could come to Europe and be socially and economically better off and your access to social media may well give you the connections and encouragement to make the trip.
 
This interconnected world also offers enormous opportunities to gain understanding, insightful data, commercial expansion and government interconnection.

The benefits that arise from these relatively recent electronic developments, such as cloud and cognitive computing, are beginning to become enormously influential. However, cyberspace as we know also includes hacker criminal threats, and the growing arena of cyber-warfare.

Everyone from governments, commercial organisations and you as individuals all need new understanding, strategies and specific tactics using Cyber’s outlook and potential. This requires a change in perspective, continued research and changes to working methods employing the relevant technology that projects into the new interconnected global future.

This 4th Revolution employs deep data analysis with interconnections and links to Bio-technology, Artificial Intelligence, robotics and the Internet of Things all of which will significantly alter us as humans and the places we work and live.

  • When used well these processes ensure our security, as well as significantly improving the broader issues of global and national macro-economics, intelligence, law enforcement and geo-politics.
  • When misused by criminals and cyber warfare activists this transformation has the potential for catastrophic outcomes.

National crime is for most countries now 50% cyber, yet this is not being focused on by national police forces who don’t have the experience or systems to deal with this type of crime.  

It is very important that all areas of government, business and commerce, continually review an electronic cyber strategy ensuring that this is used it effectively analyse their markets and ensure their security.

Background

From a government, intelligence agency and border policing perspective the strategy required to deal with CyberSpace has some historic similarities to the way in which oceans were used by nations and groups for inter-national exploration, research, trade, military and naval attacks and piracy.

The oceans have similarities in this model to the current Internet and the Web is similar to trade routes and the piracy, which was used on the trade routes as hacking is now used on the Web and across different aspects of the Internet. Piracy was also used by governments, who often called it privateering, as well as by groups of independent pirates.

Piracy was gradually contained and finally internationally significantly reduced, but this extended process took centuries to accomplish real success and finally significant aspects of it were outlawed by the Peace of Westphalia and put into international treaties by the Declaration of Paris in 1856.

In the 20th century, when the invention of aeroplanes changed many national views on international air space, it came to governments and corporates to review and legalise international flights.

The process of agreements on across border flights, although sometimes difficult was far more effective and faster as a process than the time shipping and piracy agreements had taken. A similar type of process is needed by current governments to achieve Cyber agreements and to reduce the costs of Cyber-Crime.

Not only did these historic agreements alter commerce and international trade economics, they also changed the ways in which secret intelligence organisations operated in the new environment.

In the early 1990s the Internet was an academic network that was only just beginning to reach into the outside world. Security was an afterthought. Programmers at Netscape, a firm, which made an early web browser, decided to correct that. They came up with a way to use high-quality cryptography to secure the link between a web page and its visitors.

In those days America’s government classified cryptography, then an arcane subject, of interest mostly to soldiers, diplomats and spies, as a munition, and regulated its export. American software companies could therefore supply their foreign clients only with an emasculated version that American spies, with their piles of powerful computers, were able to break.

Then in 2010 there was the first well-publicised use of a CyberWar viruses known as Stuxnet, which attacked Iran’s nuclear infrastructure. This was a layered and sophisticated attack, which was probably launched by America via Israel.

So in the commercial world how do we develop an effective Cyber Security practice

The potential business revenue from market analysis, rising compliance requirements and security threats must not be ignored. The increasing press coverage of ransomware attacks and fines for non-compliance is driving awareness and urgency. Organisations must review the best ways to go about developing sound cyber-security policies and practices in 2020/21 that could be used for commercial gain as well as internal commercial security.

Here Are 5 Key Recommendations:

1.Update software and systems

This requires centralised IT policy that adopts a 'push' methodology, forcing new security updates onto a user's device when they connect to the network, instead of a 'pull' methodology, which notifies the user that a new security patch is available and gives them the option to load this new software when it's convenient.

2. Conduct top-to-bottom Cyber Security Audits

Your company should conduct a thorough cyber security audit of its IT assets and practices.

This audit should review the security practices and policies of your central IT systems, as well as your end-user departments and at the 'edges' of your enterprise, like the automated machines and IoT you might be employing at remote manufacturing plants.

The audit should look not only at the software and hardware techniques you have in place to protect security but also at remote site personnel habits and compliance with security policies.

These audits should be carried out by an independent cyber-audit business that brings a clear understanding of cyber security to the business being audited, this would be similar to a Financial Audit and so it should also bring a certification of completion and security each year.

3. Provide continuing Cyber-Security Training

Cyber-security education should be a part of every employee’s work process. On a quarterly basis, a refresher course in cyber-security practices should also be given to employee’s company-wide. This ensures that security policies and practices stay fresh in employees' minds, and that they understand any policy additions or changes.

Business need cyber security training and we at Cyber Security Intelligence recommend GoCyber training for all employees and management. Clicke > Here <  to register for a free trial.

4. Sales and Marketing

Your planning, sales and marketing departments should use web search and analysis of the markets, your clients and potential markets and new clients. Full electronic market research is very effective for understanding your current clients and building new markets and clients.

5. Inform your Board and Chief Executive

This makes it important for Chief Information Officers, Chief Security Officers, and others with security responsibilities to clearly explain cybersecurity technologies, policies, and practices in plain language that the Board, and stakeholders understand.They must also get themselves up-to-date with new changes, opportunities and potential threats.

For more information and a Cyber Audit about your organisation’s cyber risks and about security risks in your industry please contact Cyber Security Intelligence for a cost effective strategic cyber security assessment.

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