Artificial Intelligence: Myths, Facts and Future

550x418-cochrane-mobile-intelligence.jpg

Computer scientists have been trying to creative smarter, more capable programs and, to an extent, robots, since the birth of the computer technology. It’s one thing to program something that takes cues from the operator and another to watch something operate on their own.

This was made possible through machine learning – programs were made such that they could take cues from the environment and “decide” what to do with them. This can manifest as computer adversaries in video games, robots walking on uneven land, cleaning robots knowing the layout of your apartment or predicting financial markets. This, however, is not true intelligence.

So what is true intelligence in this sense? Well, it’s somewhat ambiguous. Should artificial intelligence be as smart as an average human? Should it be smarter? Could it be as smart as a dog? Is “smart” even the right word here?

One of the key aspects of artificial intelligence, should it ever be created, is "formal" reasoning, or logic. The first programmable digital computer was based on the work of Alan Turing. His paper "Computing Machinery and Intelligence" published back in 1950, opens with the words:  “I propose to consider the question, ‘Can machines think?’ “ He expresses his views on then-emerging field:

We may hope that machines will eventually compete with men in all purely intellectual fields. But which are the best ones to start with? Even this is a difficult decision. Many people think that a very abstract activity, like the playing of chess, would be best. It can also be maintained that it is best to provide the machine with the best sense organs that money can buy, and then teach it to understand and speak English. This process could follow the normal teaching of a child.
Of course, at the time, all of this was just theory. But as far as the initial question goes, the author finds it difficult to precisely define the meaning of "thinking", at least in this situation.

He thus proposes a simple test, which would allow to determine whether a machine possesses intelligence or not – or appears to. He calls the test "imitation game" — it was only later dubbed the Turing test. Anyway, the "standard interpretation" of the Turing test is this: there are players A and B, one of which is a human, the other is a computer. Then there's the player C, the interrogator who doesn't see A and B and can communicate with them only through text. Player C asks player A and B questions, again, only in written form. Based on answers provided, eventually C has to make a choice, which one of the players A and B is a machine and which one is a human. There are different views on what actually a Turing test is, but however it may be, to this day no machine has passed any variation of the Turing test.

Not everyone wants machines to think, though. Elon Musk, engineer, inventor, business magnate, and generally one of the personalities the more tech-inclined people look up to, expressed his concern with artificial intelligence last year: I think we should be very careful about artificial intelligence. If I had to guess at what our biggest existential threat is, it’s probably that. So we need to be very careful. I’m increasingly inclined to think that there should be some regulatory oversight, maybe at the national and international level, just to make sure that we don’t do something very foolish. With artificial intelligence we’re summoning the demon. You know those stories where there’s the guy with the pentagram, and the holy water, and he’s sure he can control the demon? It doesn’t work out.

This fear of artificial intelligence is understandable – if a robot can “reason”, there’s no telling what conclusions it will come to regarding humans. With ‘digital shackles’ it won’t be a true intelligence, and without them there’s simply no telling what it will be capable of doing.

Sputnik News

 

« The Robots Taking Your Job Could Get You Killed
Hacking Critical Infrastructure: How-To Guide »

Perimeter 81

Directory of Suppliers

ZenGRC

ZenGRC

ZenGRC - the first, easy-to-use, enterprise-grade information security solution for compliance and risk management - offers businesses efficient control tracking, testing, and enforcement.

FREE eBook: Practical Guide To Optimizing Your Cloud Deployments

FREE eBook: Practical Guide To Optimizing Your Cloud Deployments

AWS Marketplace eBook: Optimizing your cloud deployments to accelerate cloud activities, reduce costs, and improve customer experience.

MIRACL

MIRACL

MIRACL provides the world’s only single step Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) which can replace passwords on 100% of mobiles, desktops or even Smart TVs.

CSI Consulting Services

CSI Consulting Services

Get Advice From The Experts: * Training * Penetration Testing * Data Governance * GDPR Compliance. Connecting you to the best in the business.

Jooble

Jooble

Jooble is a job search aggregator operating in 71 countries worldwide. We simplify the job search process by displaying active job ads from major job boards and career sites across the internet.

XYPRO Technology

XYPRO Technology

XYPRO is the market leader in HPE Non-Stop Security, Risk Management and Compliance.

WEBINAR: How to build a secure access service edge (SASE) model in AWS

WEBINAR: How to build a secure access service edge (SASE) model in AWS

Thursday, 21 October, 2021 - In this webinar, SANS and AWS Marketplace will explore SASE and share how organizations can move to a SASE model to enhance security for modern infrastructures.

IT Governance

IT Governance

IT Governance is a leading global provider of information security solutions. Download our free guide and find out how ISO 27001 can help protect your organisation's information.

Cylance Smart Antivirus

Cylance Smart Antivirus

An antivirus that works smarter, not harder, from BlackBerry. Lightweight, non-intrusive protection powered by artificial intelligence. BUY NOW - LIMITED DISCOUNT OFFER.

CYRIN

CYRIN

CYRIN® Cyber Range. Real Tools, Real Attacks, Real Scenarios. See why leading educational institutions and companies in the U.S. have begun to adopt the CYRIN® system.

Phoenix Datacom Limited

Phoenix Datacom Limited

Phoenix Datacom is a provider of solutions and professional services to improve the performance & security of data centres, networks and applications.

Bishop Fox

Bishop Fox

Bishop Fox provides tailored security consulting services to companies across all industries. Our customers include many of the top organizations in the world.

BigID

BigID

BigID is redefining personal data protection and privacy. BigID software helps companies secure their customer data & satisfy privacy regulations like GDPR.

BlueKrypt

BlueKrypt

BlueKrypt is a consulting firm for the security of IT systems and their management.

Casque SNR

Casque SNR

CASQUE SNR is the next generation of Identity Assurance that has potential to supersede existing solutions. It provides Identity Assurance for both people and things.

NuID

NuID

NuID is a pioneer in trustless authentication and decentralized digital identity.

Stanley Reid & Company (SRC)

Stanley Reid & Company (SRC)

Stanley Reid & Co is an Executive and Technical Search Firm serving the commercial market and the US Intelligence & Defense community. Our areas of expertise include Cybersecurity.

Enzoic

Enzoic

Enzoic is an enterprise-focused cybersecurity company committed to preventing account takeover and fraud through compromised credential detection.