US Cyber Attack On Iran

Mistrust and hostilities between Iran and the US are increasing with the attacks on drones, shipping and cyber hacking and the countries are certainly getting closer to outright war. Tensions between Iran and the US have increased since the United States came out of the Nuclear Agreement between Iran and global powers and now Iran says it will breach, on 27 June, the limit on its stockpile of enriched uranium that was set in the Nuclear Agreement of 2015. 

Now Iran has recently said it had exposed a large cyber espionage network it alleged was run by the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and that several US spies had been arrested in different countries as the result of this action. Security analysts say that Iran has used hackers to send phishing emails to a series of US targets. 

US-Iran tensions are growing following accusations by US President Donald Trump’s administration that Tehran attacked two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman, a vital oil shipping route and the taking down of a US drone. 

Now US Cyber Command has launched a reciprocal digital strike against an Iranian spy group that supported the recent limpet mine attacks on commercial ships, according to two former intelligence officials who were interviewed by some of the US press.

The United States has also deployed a carrier strike group and bombers to the and announced plans to deploy 1,500 troops to the Middle East, prompting fears of a conflict. 

The Iranian group, which has ties to the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, has over the past several years digitally tracked and targeted military and civilian ships passing through the economically important Strait of Hormuz, through which pass 17.4 million barrels of oil per day. Those capabilities, which have advanced over time, enabled attacks on vessels in the region for several years.

Though sources did not provide any further details of the retaliatory cyber operation, the response highlights how the Persian Gulf has become a staging ground for escalating digital, as well as conventional, conflict, with both the United States and Iran trying to get the upper hand with cyber capabilities.

The retaliatory cyber response follows several weeks of mounting tension in the region, which appeared set to boil over after last week’s attacks on two oil tankers in the Gulf. 

US officials blamed Iran for the attacks and threatened to strike back if US interests in the region were harmed. Then, on Thursday 20th June, Iranians shot down a $240 million US military drone.In response, President Trump initially authorised, but then decided against, targeted military strikes. His tweets on Friday morning said that he pulled back before any missiles were launched when he learned 150 Iranians might die.

Meanwhile, multiple private US cyber intelligence firms have reported attempts by Iranian hackers in recent weeks to infiltrate American organisations. US officials have said they fear heightened escalations not only in physical space but in cyberspace as well.

The National Security Council declined to comment on the Iranian cyber group or the US Cyber Command response. 
Iran’s cyber capabilities are not the most sophisticated, at least compared to the United States’, but they are getting better. 
Tehran’s ability to gather information and unleash offensive operations has developed significantly in the last decade or so, particularly after Iranian centrifuges at the Natanz uranium enrichment plant were struck by a malicious computer worm created by US and Israeli intelligence and first revealed in 2010. 

In 2010, the so-called Stuxnet virus disrupted the operation of thousands of centrifuges at a uranium enrichment facility in Iran. Iran accused the US and Israel of trying to undermine its nuclear program through covert operations.

“After the Stuxnet event, Iran really cranked up its capability,” said Gary Brown, who served as the first senior legal counsel for US Cyber Command and is currently a professor on cyber law at the National Defense University. Brown cited Iran’s cyber-attacks on global financial institutions, Saudi Aramco and the Sands Casino. 

Yahoo:         CBS:         Reuters:

You Might Also Read:

Iranian Cyber-Espionage Exposed:

US Under Attack By Chinese & Iranian Hackers:

 

« British Police Forensics Attacked
SMEs Need A Disaster Recovery Plan »

CyberSecurity Jobsite
Perimeter 81

Directory of Suppliers

IT Governance

IT Governance

IT Governance is a leading global provider of information security solutions. Download our free guide and find out how ISO 27001 can help protect your organisation's information.

MIRACL

MIRACL

MIRACL provides the world’s only single step Multi-Factor Authentication (MFA) which can replace passwords on 100% of mobiles, desktops or even Smart TVs.

CSI Consulting Services

CSI Consulting Services

Get Advice From The Experts: * Training * Penetration Testing * Data Governance * GDPR Compliance. Connecting you to the best in the business.

Cylance Smart Antivirus

Cylance Smart Antivirus

An antivirus that works smarter, not harder, from BlackBerry. Lightweight, non-intrusive protection powered by artificial intelligence. BUY NOW - LIMITED DISCOUNT OFFER.

Practice Labs

Practice Labs

Practice Labs is an IT competency hub, where live-lab environments give access to real equipment for hands-on practice of essential cybersecurity skills.

XYPRO Technology

XYPRO Technology

XYPRO is the market leader in HPE Non-Stop Security, Risk Management and Compliance.

Cyber Security Supplier Directory

Cyber Security Supplier Directory

Free Access: Cyber Security Supplier Directory listing 5,000+ specialist service providers.

CYRIN

CYRIN

CYRIN® Cyber Range. Real Tools, Real Attacks, Real Scenarios. See why leading educational institutions and companies in the U.S. have begun to adopt the CYRIN® system.

Syxsense

Syxsense

Syxsense brings together endpoint management and security for greater efficiency and collaboration between IT management and security teams.

Perimeter 81

Perimeter 81

Perimeter 81 is a Zero Trust Network as a Service designed to simplify secure network, cloud and application access for the modern and distributed workforce.

DriveLock

DriveLock

Our security solution is designed to prevent external attacks, which are evermore sophisticated as well as monitor, document and even prevent internal incidents.

Clearpath Solutions Group

Clearpath Solutions Group

Clearpath Solutions Group expertise covers virtualization and data storage technologies, networking, security and cloud computing.

Subex

Subex

Subex leverages its award-winning telecom analytics solutions in areas such as Revenue Assurance, Fraud Management, Asset Assurance and Partner Management, and IoT Security.

Cyber Security Raad (CSR)

Cyber Security Raad (CSR)

The Cyber Security Council (CSR) is a national, independent advisory body of the Dutch government undertaking efforts at strategic level to bolster cyber security in the Netherlands.

NETAS

NETAS

Netas offers solutions in information and communication technologies including end-to-end value added solutions, system integration and technology services to providers and corporations.

Cybercrime Support Network (CSN)

Cybercrime Support Network (CSN)

CSN is a public-private, nonprofit collaboration created to meet the challenges facing millions of individuals and businesses affected each and every day by cybercrime.

Cyber Security Courses

Cyber Security Courses

Cyber Security Courses was formed to help students in the UK find cyber security courses online.

Softline

Softline

Softline is a leading global Information Technology solutions and services provider focused on emerging markets of Eastern Europe, Americas, and Asia.